Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Pressure-Cooked Jerusalem Artichokes with Edamame (No Added Fat)

[picture is temporary] I like roasted Jerusalem artichokes, but haven't seen anything about pressure cooking them. I thought I'd try pressure cooking for a short time (5 minutes) and making a main course, combined with edamame. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • Approx. half a cup of Jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes; about 2 - 2 1/2 dozen), washed and eyes removed
  • 1 cup shelled edamame (fresh or frozen; I used frozen)
  • 1 clove garlic, finely (1/8") diced
  • 1/3 t garam masala
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cups onion cut into 3/8" cubes
  • Medium bell pepper, roasted and then cut into 1/2" cubes (approx. 1 cup) [to roast: I put the pepper atop my gas range flame and occasionally turned it till it was mostly blackened, then put in a brown paper bag that I closed down and, after 15m [I actually had a few hours, which got it even more smoky], rinsed it under running water to remove the charred areas]
  • 1T miso
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t garlic powder
Process
  1. I put the sunchokes, edamame, garlic, garam masala, turmeric, and water into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 5m.
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then added the onion, bell pepper, miso, salt, and garlic powder; I pressed down on the miso to mix it in well.
I was out but had my wife prepare Jade pearl rice (1 part rice to 2 parts water, a vegan bouillon cube, and a pinch of salt simmered, covered, for 20m). We brought home from today's farmers' market some tasty and inexpensive baby lettuce (just $1 for a large head!), and very flavorful tomatoes, which provided for our salad.
Results

Dinner was good! We all enjoyed it. The sunchokes were reminiscent of tiny baked Yukon gold potatoes. I think that my family enjoyed the sunchokes even more than I did - they certainly were good, but I think I like the sunchokes better roasted.

Ideas for the future

I should continue to experiment with sunchokes. I think that my 5m intuition on the pressure cooking time was about right - any longer and they would have been perhaps too soft. I wonder if they would have more of a "bite" of a texture if cooked for 4m. It might be fun to mash sunchokes, but they are so small that it would take quite a quantity to have a meaningful amount of mashed sunchokes.

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