Sunday, July 22, 2018

Okara Burger, Avocado Fries (No Added Fat); New Soymilk Maker

I have been thinking for a while of buying a soymilk maker and just bought the SoyaPower G4. (I also bought but didn't open their tofu making kit; I'll try it in the near future.) I opened the box last night and today made my first batch of soymilk; it was good though a bit thin, so I'll try again with more beans.

As part of the process, okara (soy pulp) is generated. It was a very light brown/off-white color with the consistency of thick oatmeal. I thought I'd make okara burgers for my daughter and me (and serve a non-soy burger to my soy-intolerant wife). I took the okara from a cup of soybeans, mixed in about 1/4 as much whole wheat pastry flour and the same amount of nutritional yeast, plus about the same amount of onion, chopped into 3/8" cubes, plus a pinch of salt, and made into two balls. I flattened them and put them in my air fryer. I baked at 350°F for six minutes to let the inside get cooked somewhat, then air fried for 5 more minutes also at  350°F.

The other fun new item I made was "avocado fries". I simply cut avocado slices, dragged them through some panko bread crumbs and salt, and air fried for 5 minutes at  375°F.


Results

My wife and I liked the avocado fries, but my daughter didn't. I took some over to a neighbor who also liked them. I thought that they were a bit too rich; one or two slices would have been enough maybe mixed into a salad. I liked how the inside of the avocado was softened by the cooking experience, almost like roasted garlic becomes. The okara was good but a bit bland. But it's exciting to see that I started with soybeans and water, and ended up with soymilk (and hot chocolate!), okara burgers, and a batch of soy yogurt (with a little of the previous batch as starter) underway.

Ideas for the future

A panko coating for the burger would have been good, especially if I didn't have other breaded dishes with the meal. I should also try making okara burgers with other ingredients mixed in, such as greens and chunks of vegetables. If I'm going to be making my own soymilk, I need to come up with more okara ideas and hope that I don't end up having to compost much of the nutritious okara that is a by-product of the soymilk (and tofu) making.

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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Air Fried Broccoli, Organic Oven Fries, Black Beans

I was out and about and asked my wife to get some beans going as a simple and nutritious side dish in the Instant Pot. She picked black beans (I had her do a 0 minute cycle to be almost equivalent to soaking overnight, then I cooked for 25 minutes).

I thought I'd continue my experiments with my air fryer and have seen several recipes for air fried broccoli. I think that Kathy Hester had a recipe, but I also quickly looked and found one recipe that included boiling the broccoli first, and another that was simpler that I modified a bit and tried.

For the broccoli, I used not just the florets, but also the chopped stalk. I made a mixture of rice milk, Panko bread crumbs, garlic granules, freshly ground black pepper, and salt, and coated the broccoli, then air fried. The recipe I modified suggested 350°F for four minutes, shaking the broccoli up, then continuing for another four minutes, but I wasn't using olive oil and thought I'd try just one go at four minutes.

I tried preparing frozen French Fries again as a side dish; this time, I used Alexia organic oven fries that only has about 3g of fat per serving, which is the goal we tell our Food for Life students for each dish. The package suggests 450°F for 18 minutes; I thought I'd try 425°F for 12m but the fries were done after about 9 minutes!
Results

My family loves the results of air frying - and it's so easy with minimal cleanup! My wife liked the broccoli; I thought it was fine, but didn't taste different than a soft raw broccoli. The breading was crispy but not strongly flavorful, and didn't really stick. The fries were great! I mixed in raw tomato and shallot with the beans, and they were very good.

Ideas for the future

I should experiment with aquafaba or use Ener-G Egg Replacer to get vegetables sticky and receptive to Panko or other coatings. I bought some golden zucchini today and am thinking of air frying it tomorrow - perhaps with no breading. I'm so happy that I have an air fryer!

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Sunday, June 24, 2018

Air "Fried" Tofu and Tempeh Steaks Coated with Quinoa

I'm excited about our new air fryer, the Cuisinart Air Fryer Toaster Oven TOA-60. I got it about a week ago and am impressed by its toasting (even and fast) and baking, with or without convection (it's fast!). I finally wanted to try the air frying function.

I believe that all "air frying" is with this oven is convection baking, maybe with faster air circulation, and with food put in a rectangular basket with holes allowing air circulation. That basket sits atop a baking tray that I put aluminum foil on to make cleanup easier.

For my first try, I was going to make a battered seitan, but my wife forgot to pick up bread crumbs and it turned out that we were out of seitan. How about tofu steaks for kiddo and me, and tempeh ones for my wife?

I have read that quinoa can be a good coating, so made some quinoa. I also bought some frozen French Fries. I put a little canola oil on a paper towel and wiped the basket to help with keeping food from sticking.

The fries were easy. I wanted to buy Cascadian Farms brand French Fries that are coated with a little apple juice to enhance browning without a lot of oil; for example, their crinkle cut fries have 4g of fat per 3 ounce serving. The store I quickly stopped at didn't have these, but they did have Alexia brand organic truffle fries, which I bought. They turned out to indeed be rather oily, with twice as much fat (8g per 3 ounces).

I covered the provided baking pan with foil to ease in cleanup and put the mesh basket, very lightly rubbed with oil, on top of the baking pan. The fries were to be cooked for 425°F for 15m, but I went with 400°F for 12m. They came out great but maybe a bit too crispy; 10-12m at 375°F would probably have sufficed.

Here is what I did for the steaks:

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup uncooked quinoa
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1/4 t salt
  • I would have used a bouillon cube, but for some reason the Rapunzel brand cubes I love haven't been available for some weeks now
  • 4 ounces tofu for two of us, cut into approx. 1/4" x 1" x 2" pieces
  • 2 ounces tempeh for one, cut into approx. 1/4" x 3/4" x 1 1/2" pieces
  • (optional) 6-10 half moons of onion (approx 3/8" thick)
  • (optional) 1/8 cup frozen or fresh mushroom pieces
  • 3T nutritional yeast
  • 1t garlic powder or garlic granules
Process
  1. I first cooked the quinoa by mixing the water, quinoa, and salt (and bouillon cube or broth, neither of which I had), bringing to a boil, then simmering, uncovered for 2 or 3 minutes.
  2. I took the quinoa off the heat and let it stand, covered (or uncovered - it may take a bit longer), for another 7-10 minutes or so till the liquid was fully absorbed and the quinoa took on its characteristic spiral shape.
  3. I dredged the tofu, tempeh, onion, and mushroom through the quinoa. The quinoa didn't stick well (in the future, I might try using a vegan "egg" such as Ener-G Egg Replacer, or even, for a savory and sweet flavor, maple syrup, first), so I mostly just patted some quinoa down on top.
  4. I air fried for 350°F for only about 7 minutes (I thought it would take longer, but it was done in 7 minutes!) and served.
Results

Wow, we all loved the results of the air fryer. The main course was surprisingly good! It was so easy and came out so crispy and flavorful. My wife and I added hot sauce and my daughter added soy sauce to the steaks. This was a very successful first attempt!

Ideas for the future

 I'd like to try making French Fries from scratch by soaking potatoes for 20m then drying them before air frying them. But the frozen ones, oily though they were, were very good. I bet less oily frozen fries would be great!

My original idea of working with seitan is exciting; I can't wait to try hopefully crispy air fried seitan. I need to make or get some bread crumbs and also consider better sticking of a coating.

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Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Broccoli and Potato with Arugula Pesto Alfredo Sauce (Almost No Added Fat)

I made a waterless meal by putting, in this order, onion, shallot, matchsticks of potato, broccoli, fennel, and fresh sage leaves into a large Saladmaster stock pan. I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped. I let it cook for about 15 minutes. I then mixed in Victoria Vegan brand arugula pesto alfredo sauce; I will classify this as an almost no added fat meal; the sauce has 5g fat per quarter cup, but I only used about 1/4 cup to make our three servings. I simmered, covered, on low for a few more minutes. I then added a bit of cubed (1/4") shallot, salt, freshly ground black pepper, and dried oregano. I served it with brown rice maifun noodles and leftover dhal.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Piracicaba Broccoli with Edamame and Kidney Beans (No Added Fat)

I purchased a number of tasty organic items from our local farmers' market, including Piracicaba broccoli, also known as Brazilian broccoli. I had it raw right after I bought it; it was quite tender and sweet! I also bought nice carrots, a green tomato for pressure cooking, strawberries, and peas.

Earlier, I had prepared red kidney beans in my Instant Pot  (beans soaked overnight and then cooked for I think 12 minutes) as a salad ingredient for a Food for Life class for fourth graders, and used a little more water than I needed. I took most of the beans, but left maybe 1/2 cup plus about the same amount of water, now a bean gravy.

I put the full tender Piracicaba broccoli, looking like broccolini with thin stalks, into the gravy, as well as carrot, frozen shelled edamame beans, garlic, onion, a bit of turmeric, kala namak (other salt would be fine, too), freshly ground black pepper, and garlic powder, and cooked on medium heat for about 10 minutes. I served, along with a little bit of leftover brown rice and tomato.
Results

I was pleased with dinner, but my wife felt that the main course could have had more spice and flavor. She enjoyed it more with a little more salt and hot sauce. I thought that the Piracicaba broccoli was great raw or cooked and, fortunately, I had purchased even more so that we can enjoy it in the next day or two.

Ideas for the future

I hope that I can continue to get Piracicaba broccoli! I'd like to explore it in many ways - raw, lightly cooked on a cast iron pan, charred on a cast iron pan, baked, steamed, and other ways. I thought that the combination of fresh flavors worked great, and will have to spice such dishes more to better delight my wife (my daughter seemed to like the main course). I liked my idea of using "bean gravy" and should try this again, maybe even mixing in flour or bread crumbs.

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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Cannellini Beans with Green Garlic, Soba Noodles, and Grilled Artichoke Heart Salad (No Added Fat)

I was happy to have a cousin in town today who came over for dinner after his business day. I thought I'd make a bean dish and was originally thinking of cooking cannellini beans then mixing vegetables and soba noodles into them. I ended up instead serving soba noodles as their own side dish. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 2 cups cannellini beans soaked overnight (I got away with soaking for maybe 3 hours and it worked out okay, but I think I'd get softer beans if I soaked for longer) then rinsed and drained again
  • Enough water to just cover the beans
  • Vegan bouillon cube
  • 3/4 cup compressed cup kale leaves, roughly hand separated from stems into approximately 3/4" squares
  • 3 medium carrots cut into large sections approximately 1/2" in size
  • Garlic to taste; 2 cloves finely (1/8" or so) chopped garlic would be good, but we had fresh green garlic, and I used at last a tablespoonful cut into larger 1/4" or so pieces
  • 1t grated or finely (1/8" or so) chopped ginger
  • 1/4 cup onion cut into 3/8" cubes
  • 1t lime juice
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t freshly ground black pepper
Process
  1. I put the beans, water, bouillon cube, kale, carrot, garlic, and ginger into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 20m. (The carrot and ginger could have cooked in much less time, but this was convenient for setting the cooking up while I was doing other things and then coming back to finish later.)
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed in the onion, lime juice, and spices.
I prepared the soba noodles by boiling for just four minutes as per the package, draining, then serving topped with a bit of black sesame seed, a slice of roasted red jalapeno pepper, and slices of green onion, as well as some coconut aminos (or soy sauce). I made a salad of grilled artichoke hearts, tomato, ume plum vinegar, a little lime juice, kalamata olives, a little salt, and black pepper.

Results

Everybody seemed to enjoy the meal, and I even packed some for some neighbors. I thought that everything came out well. The main course was a good combination of flavors and was creamy (thanks to the cannellini beans) and satisfying. I had everything ready an hour or so before my cousin, delayed in meetings, arrived and was impressed at how easily the soba noodles were to work with; rather than sticking together, they easily re-separated with a quick light fork agitation.

Ideas for the future

I should use soba noodles more often! Cannellini beans always seem to result in a luscious and, of course, healthful meal, and I should use them more often, as well. I wonder what these beans would be like with artichoke or green beans.

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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Leftover Canellini Bean and Brussels Sprout Lasagne

I made lasagne; my daughter really liked the manicotti that I recently made and I had some of Miyoko's vegan smoked "mozarella" cheese that I had used. I put four layers of lasagne down, then added leftover canellini beans with Brussels sprouts, plus some of the vegan cheese and sauce. I put down four more layers, then sauteed onion and garlic, plus mushroom and Swiss chard and more sauce. I put down a final four layers then sauce, and baked in a preheated 375°F for 40m.

Results

Dinner was good and I was pleased at "reinventing" the leftovers this way. Though it wasn't no added fat, I didn't use a lot of the vegan cheese, so it was reasonably low in fat.

Ideas for the future

It's not so difficult to make lasagne, though it does take a bit of time. One puts sauce down in a baking dish (I used a 9"x13" glass one) then boils four lasagne noodles at a time (these wheat ones cooked in about 5 minutes) and places them on the sauce. Fillings go next, then four more freshly cooked noodles, etc. I should experiment with more types of lasagne; certainly today showed that the right kind of leftover can be a good filling. I should try eggplant to get something like a moussaka lasagne.

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Friday, April 20, 2018

Brussels Sprouts with Canellini Beans (No Added Fat)

I wanted to cook with canellini beans - they're soft and creamy. I bought some organic Brussels sprouts yesterday and thought that they would go well with the beans.

I soaked the beans overnight then pressure cooked for 15m after just covering with water and adding a vegan bouillon cube. In the meantime, I sauteed halved Brussel sprouts, shallot, and garlic; when almost done (I cooked with no oil in a cast iron pan), I stirred in some red onion slices and cooked another few minutes.

I mixed the cooked beans with the sprouts, garlic powder, salt, chopped jalapeno, dried sage, and lime juice. It came out well!

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Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Tempeh with Swiss Chard (No Added Fat)

I was cooking just for my wife and myself, so used tempeh, which my daughter doesn't like. I sauteed tempeh with onion and, when almost done, added Swiss chard and cooked down a bit. I also made asparagus and served a tomato and avocado sandwich.

Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Black Bean and Corn Pupusa (prepared), Brown Basmati Rice with Swiss Chard

I saw an interesting looking product in the store and picked it up, Tres Latin Foods' pupusas, and picked up their black bean and sweet corn variety, which I thought I'd use today, as well as their kale and pinto bean pupusa. Pupusas are a traditional dish from El Salvador; I love corn masa and bet these are good.The ingredients look great:

  • (Black bean and corn pupusa) organic corn masa, water, black beans, corn, olive oil, and salt
  • (Kale and pint bean pupusa) organic corn masa, water, pinto beans, olive oil, kale, salt, chili powder, chipotle powder, and onion powder
... and each pupusa only has 3.5g of fat.

I cooked the pupusas at 400°F for 10m then pan sauteed on a cast iron pan for a few minutes per side to get them a bit crispy. I served with some stewed tomatoes and raw red onion

I also made brown basmati rice (1:2 ratio of rice to water, plus a vegan bouillon cube, and I also mixed in frozen chopped Swiss chard, then pressure cooked it all for 25m) and steamed broccoli and mixed it with sauteed onion.

Results

These pupusas are good. They're not strongly flavorful but certainly satisfying and filling; one was enough for me.

Ideas for the future

I look forward to serving more of these prepared pupusas, and would like to top them with a spicy salsa and fresh avocado and onion. It would be fun to learn to make pupusas!

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Monday, April 09, 2018

Smoked "Mozzarella" Manicotti with Spinach and Peas, Bell Pepper with Seitan, Corn (Gluten Free)

I recently found vegan smoked "mozzarella" from Miyoko's Creamery I had some brown rice manicotti shells and decided to make manicotti. The vegan cheese is a bit high in fat (it's an 8 ounce package and has 5g of fat per ounce), so I thought I'd make manicotti with half the cheese, but ended up needing about 3/4, so the total fat from the cheese (and nothing else contributed significantly more fat) was 30g of fat. The 9"x13" baking dish was heavy with the 16 filled shells and sauce; I anticipated that we'd each eat 3 shells, so have about 30g of fat x 3/16 = about 6g of fat. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 7 ounce box of manicotti shells, prepared according to directions (I used a gluten-free brown rice shell that had 16 shells that I boiled for 4 minutes)
  • About 40 ounces (I used 25 ounce jars, so went through almost two) of a favorite marinara sauce
  • 6 ounces of vegan smoked "mozzarella cheese" roughly cut into 1/2" or smaller pieces
  • 1/3 cup onion cut into approximately 1/4" cubes
  • 1/2 cup frozen (or fresh) chopped spinach
  • 1/2 pound frozen (or fresh) peas
  • (optional) Few T of nutritional yeast
  • Ingredient 2
  • 8 ounces of seitan
  • Vegan bouillon cube
  • 2 cups onion cut into half moon slices approx. 1/4" x 1 1/4" ( maybe 2/3 of a medium onion)
  • 1 1/4 cups carrot cut into 3/8" slices (3 small-medium carrots)
Process
  1. I put a thick (maybe 1/4") layer of marinara at the bottom of a 9"x13" 3-quart glass baking dish.
  2. I mixed the cheese, onion, and spinach together to make the filling.
  3. For each prepared shell, I stuffed (well, my daughter helped and she did the stuffing!) half way with the filling, then put enough peas in to leave only 1/3 of the shell empty; that I stuffed with the filling.
  4. I placed each stuffed shell in turn onto the sauce in the baking dish.
  5. Once the shells were all placed, we spread the remaining sauce on top of the shells, then my daughter generously sprinkled nutritional yeast atop.
  6. I baked the (heavy!) manicotti for 40m, covered, in a preheated 375°F oven.
I also made a simple side dish of bell pepper, onion, garlic, and seitan (I used a crumbled chorizo seitan), as well as corn.

Results

Dinner came out well. My daughter especially loved the meal. I couldn't believe that she ate 5 manicotti shells and kept saying that she wished that she had room for more. I ate 2 and was quite full.

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Monday, April 02, 2018

Whole Wheat Pearled Couscous with Tempeh and Mixed Vegetables (No Added Fat)

We had a Kindergartener friend over for dinner and I thought I'd make a simple whole wheat pearled couscous meal. The couscous is easily made in a ratio of 1 : 1.5 of couscous to water. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1 clove garlic finely minced
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pearled cousous
  • 2 1/4 cups water
  • 1 cup frozen mixed chopped vegetables
  • Vegan bouillon cube
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 8 ounce packet of tempeh cut into thin rectangles maybe 3/4" x 1/2" x 1/4"
  • 1/8 cup onion cut into 3/8" cubes (I used both red and sweet onions)
  • 1-2 T coconut aminos (or soy sauce or tamari)
  • (optional) 1/2 t dried chives
Process
  1. I dry sauteed the garlic for a minute in a large Saladmaster stock pan with no water or any other item.
  2. I then added the water and couscous, along with the vegetables, bouillon cube, and salt, and brought to a boil.
  3. Once at a boil, I reduced the heat to low and simmered, covered, for 10 minutes.
  4. While the couscous was cooking, I sauteed the tempeh and 2/3 of the onion on a cast iron pan with no oil over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the tempeh was lightly browned (maybe 7-9 minutes).
  5. I then put the tempeh and onion into a bowl, and mixed in the remaining raw onion, coconut aminos, and chives, and kept warm in a toaster oven.
  6. When the couscous was done, I served with the tempeh; for the children, who may not like tempeh, I served with beans.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Friday, March 30, 2018

Baked Potato with Mushroom Gravy (No Added Fat)

I had some prepared vegan gravy and made a simple meal. I simply poked Russet potatoes a few places (to make sure that pressure wouldn't cause them to explode) then put them in my Instant Pot pressure cooker atop the trivet with 1/4 to 1/2 cup of water and pressure steamed for 20m. I mixed in mushrooms and cooked the gravy down a bit, then served atop the potatoes. I also had a massaged kale salad and baked beans.

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Monday, March 26, 2018

Brussels Sprouts with Baby Lima Beans, Forbidden Rice Pad Thai Noodles with a touch of Peanut Satay Sauce, Grilled Artichoke Heart - Tomato Salad (No Added Fat)

Brussels Sprouts are on sale and I had a 1 pound bag of them. I thought that I'd use the Sprouts and cook them with baby lima beans, starting with a gentle saute of the Sprouts. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup onion, cut into 1/4" cubes
  • 1 garlic, finely (1/8") diced
  • 1 pound Brussels Sprouts (I counted 34), outer leaves and ends trimmed and then halved (almost 4 cups)
  • 1/4 + 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 t salt
  • Vegan bouillon cube
  • 2 cups frozen baby lima beans
  • 1 1/2 cups carrot (I used one large carrot) cut into approx. 3/8" slices
  • 1/2 cumin seed
  • 1/4 garlic powder
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1 T dried chives
  • 1/2 cups onion cut into 3/8" cubes
Process
  1. I put the garlic, onion, and Brussels Sprouts into  my Instant Pot pressure cooker and used the saute function to saute, waterlessly, frequently stirring, on low for about 5 minutes till the onion was lightly browned.
  2. I added 1/4 cup water, salt, and the bouillon cube, and reduced the saute to low. I continued stirring but less frequently for about 3-4 minutes until the water was absorbed.
  3. I then added 1/2 cup water, the lima beans, carrot, cumin seed, garlic powder, turmeric, and chives; I mixed and cooked on low pressure for 3m.
  4. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed in the onion.
I made a grilled artichoke heart - tomato salad with black pepper, ume plum vinegar, and lemon juice. As a side, I had some organic forbidden rice pad thai noodles (just brown and black rices; it cooks in a 5m boil), which I served. I had a little peanut satay sauce leftover; my family loves the sauce. I put a little sauce on their noodles and even less on mine (I was going to  call dinner "almost no added fat" but I put so little sauce on that I'll go with "no added fat").
Results

We all enjoyed dinner. The main course was better than I expected but a little softer than I had wished for.

Ideas for the future

I should try cooking Brussels Sprouts this way again, but should go with just 1 or 2 minutes of low pressure cooking.

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Monday, March 12, 2018

Brown Lentil Dhal with Potato (No Added Fat)

I thought I'd make a brown lentil dhal; lentils cook under pressure in a ratio of 1 to between 1 1/2 and 2 for 15-20 minutes; I wanted a souply dahl so thought I'd go for a 1:3 ratio for 20 minutes. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1 cup brown lentils
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 cups Russet (or other) potato cut into larger 1/2" cubes (a medium potato)
  • 1/4 cup onion cut into 1/2" cubes
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely (< 1/8") minced
  • 2 cups carrot cut into 3/8" slices (about 3-4 small carrots)
  • 1 packed cup kale, roughly hand-torn into approximately 1" pieces (stems excepted) and then cut down into approximately quarters via knife
  • 1 cup frozen sliced mushrooms
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/2 t black salt
  • 1/2 t cumin seeds
  • (optional) small piece of organic Meyer lemon, skin and interior intact
  • Another 1/4 cup onion, this time cut into 1/4" cubes
  • 1T lemon juice (I used Meyer lemon juice)
  • (optional) 2 T organic Meyer lemon skin, cut into 1/2" pieces
Process
  1. I put the lentils, water, potato, 1st batch of larger cut onion, garlic, carrot, kale, mushroom, turmeric, salt, cumin seed, and lemon into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 20m.
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed
  3. When I was ready to serve, I opened the pot slowly, and added the additional 1/4 cup onion, lemon juice, and lemon pieces. 
I was out of brown rice, so used white Jasmine rice on the side, as well as peas and carrots.

Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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