Saturday, February 17, 2018

Fava Bean and Potato Soup (No Added Fat)

I enjoy fava beans but don't find it easy to remove the skins when I cook them. I was recently in a Lebanese restaurant, Neomonde, and found split fava beans, both large and, what I bought, small. I found an appealing sounding fava bean recipe, which inspired me for a soup I made with four times as much water as beans. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups dry small split fava beans, rinsed, soaked overnight, and rinsed again (it ended up being about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 8 cups water (the recipe I referred to used a 1:4 ratio to water, but it wasn't clear if they soaked the beans, so I decided to go with between 6-10 cups and used 7 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups (about half of a large 28 ounce can) canned chopped or diced tomatoes
  • 3 1/4 cups Yukon Gold potatoes cut into approximately 1/2" cubes (4 medium potatoes)
  • 1 1/2 cups (about 3 medium) carrots cut into large 3/4" chunks
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely (1/8") minced
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/4 t freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 t cumin seed
  • 1 t fennel seed
  • 4 scallions cut into 1/2" lengths
  • 1/2 t salt
Process
  1. I put the beans, water, tomato, potato, garlic, turmeric, black pepper, cumin seed, and fennel seed into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 10m.
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed in the scallions and salt.
I served the soup with whole grain toast, lightly topped with an olive tapenade, then with tomato. I also served fire-roasted corn.

Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

Waterless Chickpeas with Russet Potato Skins, Sweet Potato (No Added Fat)

My daughter was feeling a little bit sick yesterday so is eating just a little. She wanted mashed potatoes and didn't want the skins, so I had Russet potato skins with a bit of potato on them, and had the idea of making some sort of dish for my wife and me that incorporated the potato skins. I also had made sweet potato while pressure steaming the potato (for 20 minutes in my Instant Pot pressure cooker).

I made a waterless dish; I didn't plan ahead to have beans ready, so used the one can of chickpeas I had on hand. I put into a large Saladmaster stock pan these ingredients in this order: onion, garlic, potato skins, chickpeas, and frozen spinach. I cooked waterlessly - i.e., I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped. I let it cook for about 20 minutes.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Zucchini and Tempeh, Edamame, Baked Potato (No Added Fat)

For Valentine's dinner today, it was just my wife and me, and I decided to cook with zucchini again. I sauteed in a cast iron pan some onion, garlic, zucchini, and tempeh then, once browned, put in a stock pan with spinach and marinara, and simmered on low, covered for 5-6 minutes. I served with shelled edamame (cooked waterlessly) and baked potato (that I had pressure steamed in my Instant Pot pressure cooker.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Zucchini and Vegan Sausage with Vegan "Mozzarella"

I made a simple dish by cooking in a small stock pan onion, garlic, Field Roast brand smoked apple sage sausage, and zucchini; after a few minutes, I added kale and spinach and continued cooking for a few more minutes. I then added marinara with basil and simmered, uncovered, for about 5 minutes. I served with
a little of the Miyoko's Creamery "mozzarella" cheese I had recently bought.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Monday, February 12, 2018

Udon Noodles with Toasted Black Sesame Seed, Seitan, and Vegetables (No Added Fat)

My daughter picked out a recipe from Ruby Roth's The Help Yourself Cookbook for Kids, soba noodles with toasted sesame seeds. I didn't have soba but did have udon noodles on hand, and made a simple dish inspired by her recipe by:

  • boiling udon noodles for 8m,
  • sauteeing over low heat for 3-4 minutes or so black sesame seeds on a dry cast iron pan (being careful not to burn the seeds), and
  • using a small Saladmaster stock pan to cook waterlessly (I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped) for about 15m onion, broccoli, and seitan.
I drained the noodles and rinsed them with cold water, then returned them to the pan and mixed in some coconut aminos (or soy sauce). I served, topped with toasted sesame seeds and the vegetable-seitan mix.

Results

Dinner came out surprisingly well! I wanted to have a flavorful broth for the noodles and wish I had had more time to come up with some sort of broth, but the noodles themselves were tasty, further enhanced by the coconut aminos.

Ideas for the future

I should cook more often with udon noodles; I don't think that I've used them for about 4 years. The heirloom wheat in these (I used Koyo brand organic udon noodles) gave this particular brand of noodles a nice, rich flavor. It seems like it hasn't been since late 2009 that I have cooked with soba noodles and, though I don't think I liked them as much, I should try again.

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Friday, February 09, 2018

Eggplant with Vegan Mozzarella Cheese

We're vegan and occasionally eat some vegan cheese (rarely for my wife who never liked cheese and once in a while for me as it tends to be high in fat and processed). I do like Miyoko's Kitchen (I met Miyoko at a conference where I was also presenting) products and recently found their vegan version of mozzarella, and thought I'd make an eggplant dish with this. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cups onion cut into 3/8" cubes
  • 4 cups eggplant cut into 1/2" cubes (about 2/3 of a medium eggplant)
  • 1 clove garlic, finely (1/8") minced - 15m 5m more
  • 1 1/4 ounces marinara sauce
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/2 t freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 t dried oregano
  • 3-4 ounces of vegan "mozzarella cheese" cut into small chunks as per chef's preference (mine were approximately 1/2" chunks)
Process
  1. I put, in this order, the onion and then the eggplant into a large Saladmaster stock pan. I cooked waterlessly - i.e., I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped. I let it cook for about 15 minutes.
  2. The eggplant was already nicely cooked and soft. I added the garlic and re-covered the pan for another 2 or 3 minutes.
  3. I mixed in the marinara sauce and mixed.
  4. I let the pan continue on low heat, but now uncovered, for just a few minutes till the sauce was nice and hot, stirring occasionally.
  5. I mixed in the salt, pepper, and oregano, then plated, along with baby lima beans and slices of Korean watermelon radish.
  6. I tossed the cheese pieces atop the main course and served.
Results

My whole family quite liked the cheese with its mild flavor. It went great with the eggplant. I wish that I had olives or at least capers, as they would have nicely contributed to the main dish.

In the Food for Life classes that I teach, we recommend that, as a rough rule of thumb, no course have more than about 3g of fat. I was a little high, but not greatly so. The 8 ounce packet of cheese has 56g of fat. I used a bit less than half divided among three plates, so each plate had about 9g of fat from the cheese. It was a bit decadent, but given that the other dishes were no added fat, not so bad.

Ideas for the future

I could have gotten away with a bit less cheese, though the main course was quite good as I served it. Olives or capers would definitely have been good. I should explore some caponata preparation that includes vinegar. I'd like to make a Margherita pizza sometime soon, especially if I can find large fresh leaves of basil.

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Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Potato with Lima Beans (No Added Fat)

I fed my daughter while we were out shopping so was free to use ingredients that she doesn't like for my wife and me, such as asparagus, zucchini, ginger, and jalapeno. Here is what I made for my wife and me.


Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup onion (I used a combination of onion and shallot) cut into 3/8" cubes
  • 1 medium Russet potato, cut into 3/8" cubes (it was probably 2 cups)
  • 1 cup frozen chopped spinach
  • 3/4 cup frozen baby lima beans
  • 1t chopped (approx. 1/4" cubes) jalapeno
  • 1T chopped (approx. 1/4") ginger
  • 4T salsa
  • 1T fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t jerk seasoning
  • 1/4 t garlic powder
Process
  1. I put, in this order, the onion, potato, spinach, lima beans, jalapeno, and ginger into a large Saladmaster stock pan. I cooked waterlessly - i.e., I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped. I let it cook for about 20 minutes.
  2. I then mixed in the salsa, rubbing away any build up at the bottom of the pan, and let the ingredients continue to cook just for another minute.
  3. I turned the heat off and mixed in the lemon juice, salt, jerk seasoning, and garlic powder.
I served with some sauteed (in a cast iron pan with no oil) asparagus, zucchini, and onion, as well as tomato slices.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

Tuesday, February 06, 2018

Red Split Lentil Dhal with Okra (No Added Fat)

I decided to make a red split lentil dhal with okra. Red split lentils cook in a 1 to 2 or 2.5 part ratio of lentils to water over 13-18 minutes; I went with 1:2 for 15 minutes. Here is what I did.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup red split lentils
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups frozen chopped okra
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/4 cup shallot (medium shallot) cut into 3/8" cubes
  • 1 cup corn kernels (I used frozen roasted corn)
  • 1/4 cumin seeds
  • 1/4 t salt (I used kala namak)
  • 2T fresh lemon juice (I used Meyer lemon juice)
Process
  1. I put the lentils, water, okra, and turmeric into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 15m.
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed in the shallot, corn, cumin seeds, salt, black pepper, and lemon juice, and served with tomato slices and brown rice.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Friday, February 02, 2018

Seitan with Potatoes (No Added Fat)

I thought that I'd make a dish with seitan and had the idea of combining potato into the main course. I thought I'd chop potato into small cubes and pressure cook, then mix in seitan and frozen peas. I ended up also mixing in mushroom; both peas and mushroom were frozen, so I cooked for another "zero minutes" (i.e., just let the cooker get up to pressure and then stop) at low pressure. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 3 medium Yukon Gold potatoes cut into 3/8" cubes (about 3 cups)
  • 1 clove garlic, finely (1/8") diced
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 8 ounces of seitan (I used strips but any cut would be fine, according to diner's preferences)
  • 3 cups (about 4 ounces frozen) mushroom slices or pieces
  • 1 cup peas
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8-1/4 t (as per preference) oregano or jerk seasoning (I used jerk seasoning)
Process
  1. I put the potato, garlic, and water into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 2m.
  2. After the cooking was done, I waited a few minutes and gently released pressure, then mixed in the seitan, mushroom, and peas; the water was a bit low so I added another few tablespoons water (the potato even at just 2 minutes was nicely cooked!).
  3. I cooked for "zero minutes" at low pressure. 
  4. When I was ready to serve, I opened the pot slowly, and added salt, pepper, and jerk seasoning, and served, along with brown rice and corn.

Results

Dinner was good! The potato could have been cooked for less time and ended up being not the consistency of mashed potatoes, but still quite soft. It was all tasty and went well together.

Ideas for the future

I bet I could add all the ingredients at once, frozen and fresh, and cook for 1 or 2 minutes under pressure. What a fast way to an easy, tasty, and nutritious meal! Carrots would have been nice in this dish, and sauteeing mushroom and adding at the end instead of cooking with the other ingredients might be a nice difference.

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Friday, January 26, 2018

Lemongrass Basil Vegetables, Edamame and Mung Bean Pasta

I was teaching my daughter in our homeschool into the evening, then had to quickly get dinner going. I heated a simple bean dish for her then got to work on dinner for my wife and me. I had on hand lemongrass basil simmer sauce, and thought I'd cook some vegetables and tempeh or seitan with it - but, surprisingly, we were out of both seitan and tempeh. Instead, I decided to go with just vegetables and used about 1 1/2 cups frozen peas, about a compressed cup and a half of kale leaves, roughly hand torn from the stems into about 1" pieces, a cup or so of carrot cut into 3/8" slices.

I cut up about a half dozen Yellow Finn potatoes into approximately 1" pieces and pressure steamed them, along with a peeled but uncut clove of garlic for 6 minutes. In the meantime, I put the vegetables and kale (as well as a teaspoon of coarsely chopped ginger) into a large pan and cooked, stirring occasionally, for about 10-12 minutes. The vegetables were partially but not fully cooked, by design.

When the potato (and garlic - but I forgot about it! I think once it was roasted and I scooped the potatoes out, the garlic came out and was crushed) was done, I mixed the potato and simmer sauce into the vegetables and served, along with cucumber slices topped with jerk seasoning, and edamame and mung bean pasta. Six minutes, by the way, was perfect and perhaps even a minute too long - the potato was nicely cooked.
Results

Dinner was good! I have been thinking for over a year that I should more frequently use sauces in my cooking and certainly some quality purchased sauces can be a good way to go. The fat of the sauce was something like 10g, but that was enough for at least 3 servings, so we're at about the 3g of fat per course in a meal that we recommend in our Food for Life classes.

The sauce was indeed good, and the combination was good. I had meant to include broccoli but forgot - and it may be just as well, as the broccoli would have added too much volume to the dish. My wife and I both liked the semi-cooked vegetables with fully cooked potato.

Ideas for the future

I should continue to periodically integrate homemade and purchased sauces. I'll remember to prepare potatoes in this way for future dishes. If I were to make something similar, I might want to include roasted bell pepper. Jalapeno, were I not serving my daughter, would also be good, as well as more ginger. I wonder what a similar dish might be with fruit like mango or pineapple, perhaps with seitan and one green, plus a Thai sauce.

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Thursday, January 25, 2018

Brussels Sprouts with Plantain, Chickpea with Spinach (No Added Fat)

I was going to make a chickpea main course and had chickpeas soaking and then set to pressure cook for 30 minutes. However, I found on sale good looking Brussels Sprouts, so made a Brussels Sprouts main course by sauteeing without oil over medium heat on a cast iron pan halved sprouts with garlic and onion. I added a little more onion as well as a chopped (3/8") plantain about 10 minutes later, once I had some charring on the sprouts. I cooked for 5-7 more minutes till the plantain was cooked, then mixed in a little salt, freshly ground black pepper, fennel seed, garlic powder, ume plum vinegar, and lemon juice, then kept it warm in my toaster oven till ready to serve.

I put a little garlic and some frozen spinach into the cooked chickpeas and returned to pressure cook for another 5 minutes. I mixed in a little onion, cumin powder, lemon juice, and salt, and served, along with the Brussels Sprouts and salad.
Results

Pending

Ideas for the future

Pending

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Friday, December 15, 2017

Homemade Cannellini Bean - Artichoke Burger (No Added Fat)

I had my wife make a batch of cannellini beans while I was out; they weren't soaked, so she pressure cooked a cup of them for "0 minutes" (i.e., just brought to pressure then rinsed before cooking again) and then added 1/4 cup or so of grilled "ArtiHeart" artichokes and 3 cloves of roughly chopped garlic, and pressure cooked for 20 minutes. I blended the result along with a little onion, garlic powder, salt, and nutritional yeast, then grilled on a cast iron pan with no added oil, making a patty with my hands and then covering with a light coating of whole wheat pastry flour. I also served some mixed vegetables and organic Mandarin with an olive.

My daughter especially loved the burger! I am happy that it did come out well. I should make more burgers from scratch.

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Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Waterless Curried Cauliflower, Brown Lentils (No Added Fat); Oatmeal Raisin - Meyer Lemon Cookies

The weather became cold tonight and I felt like a warm soup. I thought I'd make a main course of a curried cauliflower dish along with a dhal. Frankly, I prefer a chunkier not even quite stew to dhal often, but though I've tried cooking dishes like lentils at the low end of the water and high end of the time required, I generally get a product more liquidy than I expect (I do like dhal and soup, but often try for something thicker, which I also like!). Tonight, I ended up with a nice consistency of my lentil dish which was actually just a tad bit dryer than it could have been. Here is what I did.

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 1 1/2 times as much water (i.e., 2 1/4 cups)
  • 1 cup carrot cut into 3/8" slices (I used 3 small carrots; if they weren't thin, I'd have halved them, as well)
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely (1/8") minced
  • About 2T organic Meyer lemon, including all (flesh and rind), cut into 3/8" cubes (if no organic Meyer lemon or no Meyer lemon at all is available, then skip and mix in 1T fresh lemon or lime juice at the end)
  • 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/2 t ground cumin
  • 1/3 t fennel seed
  • 1/4 cup onion cut into approx. 1/4"x1" half moons
  • Florets from head of cauliflower (about 6 cups)
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1/4 cup onion cut into 3/8" cubes
  • Another 1/4 t turmeric
  • 1/4 + 1/4 = 1/2 t salt
Process
  1. I put the lentils, water, carrot, garlic, Meyer lemon, turmeric, cumin, and fennel into my Instant Pot pressure cooker and cooked for 20m (lentils cook in a 1 part to 1.5-2 parts ratio of lentils to water for 15-20m).
  2. While the lentils were cooking, I put, in this order, the onion, cauliflower, and peas into a large Saladmaster stock pan (I had a half dozen pieces of bell pepper cut up and went ahead and threw them in, as well). I cooked waterlessly - i.e., I covered the pan and heated it on medium high until the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat to low till the jiggle stopped. I let it cook for about 20 minutes.
  3. I mixed in 1/4 t salt and the additional 1/4 t turmeric, and served.
  4. When the lentils were ready to be removed from the de-pressurized cooker, I mixed in 1/4 t salt and served.
Results

Dinner was good! The lentil dish was a bit more solid than I had wished for, but was good. The cauliflower was tasty. Everybody enjoyed the meal.

Ideas for the future

I should try this again with a ratio of 1 : 1 3/4 lentils to water. Mango powder would go well with the lentils.

Cookies!

I don't cook desserts often, though I like to blend frozen fruit with a little almond creamer to make an almost no fat "ice cream". We have a cookie exchange on Friday, and my daughter wanted to make oatmeal raisin cookies. I had the idea that I could mix in some delicious organic Meyer lemon juice.

There are many good recipes readily available. I came up with the following, similar to many that I had found, such as one from theveglife.com, and made a batch of 10 cookies as a trial tonight. We all loved the cookies! They're not without fat, but each cookie was about 4 or 4 1/2 g of fat, which isn't bad for a treat (a Tablespoon of Earth Balance margarine is 11g of fat; I used less than 4T for 10 cookies).

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (4 T) Earth Balance margarine (or other vegan butter or margarine) at room temperature
  • 3/8 cup brown sugar (or turbinado sugar or some combination of the two)
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 t baking soda
  • 1/2 t cinnamon
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 T ground flax
  • 1 1/2 T water
  • Juice of 1/2 Meyer lemon
  • Skin of 1/3 Meyer lemon cut into 1/4" pieces

Process

  • I preheated my oven to 350°F.
  • I had my daughter mix with a utensil the sugar into the Earth Balance.
  • Once homogeneous, I started adding a little bit of the flour at a time till it was all mixed in, then continued with the baking soda, cinnamon, and vanilla extract.
  • Next, we mixed in the oats, raisins, flax, water, and lemon/lemon pieces.
  • We divided the dough into approximately tablespoonfuls an inch or so apart on a cookie sheet, and pressed down to flatten the tops a bit.
  • With the preheated oven ready, I put the cookie sheet in to bake for 8-9 or maybe 10 minutes till the edges were just turning golden.
  • I removed the cookies from the oven and let them sit a few minutes till firm enough that I could remove them to a cookie wire rack to cool.
The cookies were very good! We tried some cookies with a few chocolate chips put on top of the finished cookies while still warm. They were very good, too, but didn't add a significant flavor, though my wife was partial to them.

When I make these on Thursday night in a larger quantity for the Friday event, I'll increase the raisin content a bit. The sweetness was just right. I could have included a little more vanilla if I wished. Yum!

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Sunday, December 10, 2017

Potato and Black Bean Pie (No Added Fat)

My wife recently picked up a lot of potatoes. I thought I'd try a potato pie. I had one frozen whole wheat pie shell left. I recently made pizza with it and, since this shell is really meant for lighter desserts, the pie fell apart a bit when I served. My fear for that with my vegetable pie proved true, and I should try more hearty crusts or maybe a double crust for main courses. Anyway, this is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 4 cups Yukon Gold or yellow potatoes cut into 3/8" slices (I used 3 medium yellow potatoes)
  • 1/2 cup shallot cut into 1/4" slices (I used a big shallot that yielded the 1/4 cup with slices about 1 1/4" x 1/4")
  • 1 cup frozen sliced mushroom
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 15 ounce can black beans, well rinsed - about 2 cups
  • 9" pie shell (I used a whole wheat one)
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1/3 t salt
  • 1/3 t fresh ground black pepper
Process
  1. I cooked the potatoes in boiling water for about 13 minutes (or until the potato was cooked at the edges but almost cooked in the center - a fork could be pressed in with a little bit of effort)
  2. I then added in the shallot and frozen vegetables and cooked for 4 more minutes
  3. I drained and put these cooked ingredients into a bowl, and mixed in the beans (if I had used fresh mushrooms and peas, I could have added them at this point instead of to the boiling water) and seasonings
  4. I filled the pie shell (and, in fact, had a bit extra filling) and cooked, uncovered, in a preheated 375°F oven for about 13-15 minutes till the crust was done.
I served with grilled "ArtiHeart" artichokes and an interesting salad, tomato and olive with a little Ume plum vinegar, salt, black pepper, and oregano, plus pieces of a small tangerine.

Results

Wow! We all loved dinner. I was thinking that I might need a sauce for the pie, such as, perhaps, a tomato (or, for my wife and me, a spicy arrabiata) sauce. I did sprinkle a little vegan cheese on my daughter's serving, but really the pie was better than I expected, other than its not holding together.

Ideas for the future

I should make more pies with appropriate crusts. Maybe a covered pie? The seasonings turned out, we all felt, to be just right tonight, so I can't think of any improvements to the pie. I could make similar pies but incorporate other vegetables and maybe seitan instead of beans.

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Tuesday, December 05, 2017

"Rice Beans" (Phaseolus vulgaris) with Madagascar Pink Rice (No Added Fat)

A few days ago, I found in a gourmet market an interesting looking thin bean called a "rice bean", also known as frijol arroz. It is quite small, like large rice grains, and cooks stovetop in just 20-25 minutes with 2" of water above the beans. The website description, however, suggests 30 minutes:

Rice Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) are related to the Kidney Bean. They have a mild flavor and firm texture. Grown in Idaho, these beans are 1/4" long and are pill-shaped, like a giant grain of rice. Their uniform ivory white color and unique shape make it hard to believe they're really beans. This quick cooking bean makes it ideal for dinners in a hurry, perfect for cold pasta and vegetable salads. Rice Beans are also great mixed with colored rices such as wild rice or Thai black sticky rice. There is no soaking required. Rinse beans well. Place in pot and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain and serve. One cup dry yields 2 cups cooked.

How handy to have beans that cook so quickly! I was originally thinking of making a bean and rice dish but then thought I'd combine them and use the color contrasting Madagascar Pink rice. This rice cooks in 20m in a 1 part rice to 1 3/4 part water, but I usually go with a 1:2 ratio.

I had thought of making a vegan "cheese" sauce, as I have done in the past and described this past March, but I didn't have any cashews. I found an interesting potato and nutritional yeast based sauce recipe, but at that point I didn't have enough time to make it. I did sprinkle a few shreds of Daiya brand vegan "cheddar" on my daughter's portion. Here is what I did.


Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup "rice beans", well rinsed
  • 1/3 cup Madagascar Pink rice
  • Little less than 1/3 cup marinara sauce
  • Water: I tried having twice as much water in volume as rice, and three times as much as beans, so used 1 2/3 cup water
  • 1/8 t salt
  • 1/4 t garlic powder 25m
  • 1/4 cup (or bit less) onion cut into 3/8" cubes
Process
  1. I mixed everything but the onion in a pan, brought to a boil, and simmered for 25 minutes.
  2. I waited a few minutes, then quickly opened the pan, fluffed the rice, and sampled the dish; the beans were a bit too firm, so I added another 1/4 cup water and simmered for another 7 minutes.
  3. I mixed in the onion and served.
I also made some waterless broccoli by putting a little onion and then frozen broccoli florets in a large Saladmaster stock pan. I cooked, covered, till the vapor release started jiggling, then I reduced the heat so the jiggling mostly stopped and simmered for 15 minutes or so. I added a little salt, black sesame seed, and 2 cloves finely chopped garlic, stirred, and returned to low heat, covered, for just 2-3 more minutes.

Results

I thought that the bean didn't have much flavor and was perhaps a bit undercooked. My wife and daughter seemed to very much like the dish; I thought it was interesting and can be improved.

Ideas for the future

I should have known better than to try a new ingredient like this bean immediately in combination. I should making these tiny beans again by themselves and cooking for a longer time, or maybe just go with pressure cooking as usual and try 1/4 to 1/3 the time, or about 10-12 minutes, without soaking. I would love to figure out how to both nicely cook with these beans and to find them more commonly.

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